The 528th Convocation, University Ceremony – The University of Chicago


[MUSIC PLAYING] VICTORIA E. PRINCE: As
Marshal of the University, it is my honor to declare
open the proceedings of the 528th Convocation of
the University of Chicago and to introduce the
University’s 13th president, Robert J. Zimmer. Please be seated. ROBERT J. ZIMMER: Good
afternoon and welcome. As the Marshal has
just announced, today’s ceremony
is the 528th time that the University
of Chicago has assembled for a convocation. These convocations
allow students to be recognized and celebrated
for their achievements after completion
of their studies and to do so through formal
exercises, just as we do today. The primary purpose
of convocation is, of course, to award
degrees, but these occasions satisfy other
objectives as well. At convocation number
one on January 2, 1893, the University’s first
president, William Rainey Harper, set out goals
for these ceremonies, goals leading to practices
that we continue to observe. Harper believed these
occasions of high ceremony to be a necessary
and nourishing part of the life of a
university and intended them to literally
call together or cause to assemble all parts of
the University community. In Harper’s words,
“Convocations are meant to bind together into a unity
the many complex and diverging forms
of activity which constitute our University’s
life and work.” Today’s ceremony, then,
is also about reflecting upon the whole of what we do
across the many libraries, laboratories, and classrooms
that make up our campus. And in addition, it
affords us all a moment to reflect upon the
accomplishments of our past and the opportunities
for our future individually, collectively,
and institutionally. I confer the degrees awarded
this afternoon by virtue of the authority delegated
to me by the University’s board of trustees,
represented today by trustee Mary Lou Gorno. And I do so on behalf of the
faculty of the University of Chicago that
has responsibility for the educational
programs recently completed. I again welcome you to
the 528th Convocation, a time-honored ritual that
recognizes achievements of which we can all be proud. DANIEL DIERMEIER: As Provost
of the University of Chicago, I am pleased to introduce
Juan de Pablo who will present today’s convocation address. He’s the Liew Family
Professor of Molecular Theory and Simulations in the Institute
for Molecular Engineering at the College and senior fellow
in the Computation Institute. Professor de Pablo is
a leader in developing computational simulations
of molecular and large-scale phenomena. The materials he
has helped to create have implications in the areas
of health, medicine, industry, and academia. As a founding faculty member
of the University’s Institute for Molecular Engineering and
a senior scientist at Argonne National Laboratory,
Professor de Pablo develops new technologies
and shapes the direction of research in his field. He holds more than 20 patents
on multiple technologies and has over 450 publications,
which have received more than 18,000 citations. In 2016, Professor de Pablo was
elected to the National Academy of Engineering,
one of the highest professional distinctions
awarded to engineers. He was also honored with
the 2016 DuPont Nutrition and Health Sciences
Excellence Medal for work that is currently used
in the global food and probiotic industries
and presents opportunities for the preservations
of pharmaceutical cells and tissue. Professor de Pablo is a
fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the
American Physical Society. He’s an honorary member of the
Mexican Academy of Sciences and serves as the chair
of the editorial board for the interdisciplinary
journal Molecular Systems Design & Engineering. Professor de Pablo
has been a member of the University of
Chicago faculty since 2012. The title of his talk is Fate,
Preparation, and Opportunity. Juan. JUAN DE PABLO: Thank
you, Provost Diermeier. I’m so excited to be here. I cannot think of an
occasion that is more worthy of celebration than graduation. You have worked so
hard your entire lives to get to this point,
and here we are. You are graduating
with an advanced degree from one of the finest
universities in the world. That is an extraordinary
achievement. And to the parents,
husbands, wives, partners, and children, all
the graduates, we say thank you, because we
know that without your help and your support,
it will be very difficult, if not impossible,
to get to this point. So yes, today we celebrate. We are all very
lucky to be here. But tomorrow we’ll
continue preparing for the rest of our lives. And we all hope that
fate will be on our side and allow us to live
rewarding, productive lives. And that is really
what I wanted to talk to you about this afternoon–
fate, preparation, opportunity, and luck. The Stoic philosopher
Seneca once said, “Luck is what happens when
preparation meets opportunity.” As I was reflecting
on my own career and I tried to remember
the things that I did when I was exactly
at your stage in life, fresh out of graduate
school, it became apparent that the extent to
which I was lucky, it was because I was
prepared to take advantage of a series of unrelated
events that occurred to me as I went about my own business. You see, just as I was
finishing my PhD degree I went on several
interview trips, and I decided to
accept a lucrative job with a large chemical company in
the Netherlands, in Amsterdam. I was so excited about moving
to Europe, being on my own, to Amsterdam of all places. And I was looking forward
to having more money. That was important to me. I was done with school, like
perhaps some of you are. But just as I was getting
ready to make the transition from academia to
industry, my advisor told me, Juan, you know what? Before you go to
Amsterdam, I’d like you to go give a seminar
about your research to the University of Wisconsin. I talked to a friend
of mine in Madison, and he’s eager to meet you
and so are his colleagues. So of course I
follow his advice. I went on the trip. I met most of the faculty there. And at the end of the visit,
the chairman of the department sat down with me and he simply
said, how would you like to join us here as a professor? And right there I knew
that’s what I wanted to do. And I said, I’d
like that very much. So without a written
offer or anything, that night I called that company
in the Netherlands and I said, you know what, I’m not coming. I found a different job. And I never regretted
that choice. So eventually I joined the
University of Wisconsin as an assistant professor,
full of enthusiasm. And right about
the one-year mark, things were not going that well. I was having trouble
recruiting students. My lectures were not very good. You should have seen my
teaching evaluations. And a dear colleague,
who happened to be my next door
office neighbor, passed away unexpectedly. And before he died,
he left instructions to my other colleagues to have
his experimental equipment be given to me. I didn’t know what to do. You see, I was trained
as a theoretician. All I wanted to do
was use supercomputers to design new molecules. My plans had nothing
to do with real life. And here I was, faced with
the choice of launching an experimental program. Now, I am an engineer. But throughout my life, I’ve
always been very interested in biology, animals, insects. So as a hobby, I often
read journals and books having to do with biology. And as I was pondering this
choice about whether to start an experimental
program or not, I ran into a really
intriguing article about various organisms,
insects and plants, that are able to survive
extended periods of drought without any water. Some of these
insects can, in fact, survive for over 100 years
in the absence of water by entering a state of
suspended animation. At the time, it wasn’t
clear how that worked. But biologists thought
that they did so by producing large
amounts of special sugars and replacing the water in
their bodies with those sugars. So in a sense, what these
insects and animals were doing was coating themselves
with hard candy. I found it fascinating,
and I decided to pursue the study of those
processes as a research topic. So I did agree to inherit
my colleague’s equipment, and I started to experiment with
insects, plants, and the sugars they produce. And perhaps
foolishly, I invested all of my start-up funds on that
project, which was really far from my expertise. Turned out to be a very good
choice and one that eventually led to publications and,
with time, to processes that allow one to store
pharmaceutical products, cells and even tissues, for subsequent
transplant over extended periods of time. So when I tell this story to
my students and to my friends, to my son, they all
immediately comment how lucky I was to start
my career in that way. And it is true, I was lucky. But really making
that transition, I had to take a number of risks. And I could take
the risks because I was prepared to take them. I had a broad
range of interests, and my advisor in
grad school had insisted that I perform
some experimental work just to get rid of the fear
of doing laboratory work. He was just trying to
position all of his students for everything. So Seneca was right. I think that luck
is what happens when preparation meets opportunity. That is the advice that
I’d like to pass on to you. Preparation is essential
for everything you do, and it allows you to take risks. And the story that I
just told you really is about creating opportunities
for yourselves that will allow you to pursue exciting careers. Now, as Professor
Zimmer said, this is the 528th Convocation of
the University of Chicago. That means that 527 previous
speakers have stood right here in front of you, all of them
University of Chicago faculty, to give you some
words of wisdom. So really, much of what
can be said has been said. This occasion, however,
is a little bit different. This is the first
convocation where the person speaking to you
is a professor of engineering at the University of Chicago. So that is really something,
if you think about it– engineers at Chicago. You see, it is also highly
relevant for the thoughts that I’m trying to
convey this afternoon. Engineering really
is a profession that is all about
preparation and about taking controlled risks. In its purest form,
engineering takes what we learn from the sciences,
the arts, and the humanities, and we try to
develop technologies that will benefit humanity. That requires breadth. You must keep up with
the latest discoveries in a wide range of
disciplines, and it involves taking enormous,
tremendous risks. Building a plane that
can carry 400 passengers from one continent to another,
that involves a lot of risks. Designing the pacemakers that
millions of people will wear involves risks, and it
takes a lot of guts. And of course, in
these instances, the difference between
assuming controlled risks and recklessness is
how much you know and how well you are prepared. So a good example
of what it means to be deep and broad
and outward-looking in your profession is provided
by the likes of Carl Bosch, who can arguably be considered
one of the founders of molecular engineering. With his colleague
Fritz Haber, Bosch developed the process that is
used today to produce ammonia. Now, Carl Bosch was the
heir to a wealthy family, an engineering concern really. But rather than joining
the family business he decided to pursue
a career of his own. He first received training as
a mechanical engineer and later as an industrial chemist. Now, we’re talking
about events that happened about a century
ago, when Europe was still importing guano from
Chile to make fertilizers. Now, Bosch was
remarkably broad, and he understood the importance
of fixing nitrogen from the air to prepare
synthetic fertilizers. He took a discovery
by his friend Fritz Haber, who had come up with
a uranium-based catalyst to convert nitrogen
from the air to ammonia, and he understood
molecular transformations well enough, deeply enough,
that he could come up with more variable
materials that could enable commercial
production of ammonia. Now, at the time,
very little was known about high-pressure
processes, 100 years ago. But Bosch had the
engineering background to convince his employer,
BASF, about the feasibility of his ideas. And he set out to design
giant compressors, ultra-high pressure
reactors that operated at very high
temperatures that handled extremely
dangerous, explosive gases. And within only five years
from conception to practice, he was producing
12,000 tons of ammonia. Now, today, it takes
us 20 years to do that. He did that 100 years ago. Now, Carl Bosch was an
outward-looking man, willing to take tremendous
risks to fulfill his vision. And in doing so, he
changed humanity. His process saved
millions from starvation. And unfortunately,
of course, there’s a dark side to this story. 20 years later, the Haber-Bosch
process that he created allowed Hitler to
produce explosives in Nazi Germany that helped
prolong the Second World War. Bosch himself was a vocal
critic of the Nazi regime, and he died in despair. But his legacy has
survived the test of time. And today, half of
the world’s food is involved with the
Haber-Bosch process. 80% of the nitrogen
in your bodies is produced using this process. Now, of course, the story of
Bosch, the molecular engineer, is repeated throughout
all fields of study, even structural. Take mathematics, for example. Emmy Noether, one of the
greatest mathematicians of all times, who took great
personal risks when she decided to pursue a career in
mathematics as opposed to teaching languages
in a school for girls, had to take tremendous chances. When she started
college, she was not allowed to formally enroll in
math courses at the university, but she could audit
them with permission of the individual professors. She somehow passed
her graduation exam from the university. And then she took
yet another gamble. She was so convinced about
her own ideas and her skills that she worked
for over a decade without pay teaching
mathematics, covering for others, really,
as a substitute lecturer. At the time, the
early 1900s, women were not allowed to teach
mathematics at the university. But working without pay,
without a formal title, without a formal
position, she went on to develop abstract algebra. She proved Noether’s
theorem, which in turn enabled the
developmental of all of modern physics. She was brave. She was prepared. And she was willing to gamble
her future and her livelihood, really, to get the
career that she wanted, not the one that
she was told to settle for. So really, I am convinced that
taking risks and stretching yourself to the limit of your
abilities will make your career and your life a
lot more rewarding. And the beauty of it
all is that today you leave the University of Chicago
with an incredible foundation, one that will allow
you to do just that. So I hope that you’ll be able
to build on that foundation because the possibilities
are infinite. So congratulations
on your achievements, and I wish you very good luck. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC – LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN,
“ODE TO JOY”] DANIEL DIERMEIER: As we begin
the presentation of degrees, may I call your
attention to the awards of honors listed in the
Convocation program, as well as the names of
candidates receiving degrees today in absentia. At this time, in the
favoring presence of the congregation
here assembled, the deans of several
faculties, or their appointed representatives, will
present the candidates for academic degree to the
president of the University. James T. Sparrow,
Associate Dean and Master of the Social Science
Collegiate Division, will now present candidates
for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science
in programs in the college. JAMES T. SPARROW: Mr.
President, these students have completed the
prescribed program of undergraduate studies. On behalf of the
faculty of the College, I have the honor to
present them as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of
Arts or Bachelor of Science. ROBERT J. ZIMMER: By virtue of
the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree
of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science and welcome
you to the fellowship of educated individuals. JAMES T. SPARROW:
[READING NAMES] [APPLAUSE] DANIEL DIERMEIER: The Dean of
the Graham School of Continual Liberal and Professional
Studies will now present candidates for
the degrees of Master of Liberal Arts and
Master of Science in programs in
the Graham School. MARK R. NEMEC: Mr.
President, these students have completed the program
of studies prescribed by the faculty of the Graham
School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies. I have the honor to
present them as candidates for the degree of
Master of Liberal Arts. ROBERT J. ZIMMER:
You have successfully completed a program of advanced
study in the liberal arts. And by virtue of the
authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree
of Master of Liberal Arts. And I express the hope
that your learning will lead you to advance knowledge
in or enrich the practice of your chosen field. MARK R. NEMEC: Kathleen Rice,
[? Janae ?] Nicole Winters. [APPLAUSE] Mr. President, these students
have completed the program of studies prescribed by
the faculty of the Graham School of Continuing Liberal
and Professional Studies. I have the honor to
present them as candidates for the degree of
Master of Science. ROBERT J. ZIMMER:
You have successfully completed a program of advanced
study in your profession. And by virtue of the
authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the
degree of Master of Science. And I express the hope
that your learning will lead you to advance knowledge
in or enrich the practice of your chosen field. MARK R. NEMEC: [READING NAMES] [APPLAUSE] DANIEL DIERMEIER: The Dean of
the Division of the Biological Sciences and the Pritzker
School of Medicine will now present a candidate for
the degree of Master of Science and candidates for the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy in programs in the Division
of the Biological Sciences and the Pritzker
School of Medicine. KENNETH S. POLONSKY: Mr.
President, this student has completed the program
of studies prescribed by the faculty of the Division
of the Biological Sciences and the Pritzker
School of Medicine and the special programs
approved by his department. I have the honor to present him
as a candidate for the degree of Master of Science. ROBERT J. ZIMMER:
You have successfully completed a program
of advanced study in the biological sciences. And by virtue of the
authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the
degree of Master of Science. And I express the hope
that your learning will lead you to advance knowledge
in or enrich the practice of your chosen field. KENNETH S. POLONSKY: [INAUDIBLE] [APPLAUSE] Mr. President, each
of the students I now present has attained
scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has
prepared a dissertation that contributes to knowledge in a
particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of
the Division of the Biological Sciences and the Pritzker
School of Medicine, I have the honor to
present them as candidates for the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy. ROBERT J. ZIMMER: By virtue of
the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy and welcome you to this
ancient and honorable company of scholars. KENNETH S. POLONSKY:
[READING NAMES] [APPLAUSE] DANIEL DIERMEIER: The Dean of
the Division of the Humanities will now present candidates
for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy
in programs in the Division of the Humanities. ANNE WALTERS ROBERTSON:
Mr. President, this student has completed the program
of studies prescribed by the faculty of the
Division of the Humanities and the special programs
approved by his department. I have the honor to present him
as a candidate for the degree of Master of Arts. ROBERT J. ZIMMER:
You have successfully completed a program of advanced
study in the humanities. And by virtue of the
authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the
degree of Master of Arts. And I express the hope
that your learning will lead you to advance knowledge
in or enrich the practice of your chosen field. ANNE WALTERS ROBERTSON:
Garrett Arthur Allen. [APPLAUSE] Mr. President, each
of the students I now present has attained
scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has
prepared a dissertation that contributes to knowledge in a
particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of
the Division of the Humanities, I now have the honor
to present them as candidates for the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy. ROBERT J. ZIMMER: By virtue of
the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy and welcome you to this
ancient and honorable company of scholars. ANNE WALTERS ROBERTSON:
[READING NAMES] [APPLAUSE] DANIEL DIERMEIER: The Dean of
the Division of the Physical Sciences will now
present candidates for the degrees of Master
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in programs in
the Division of the Physical Sciences. EDWARD W. KOLB: Mr.
President, these students have completed the program
of studies prescribed by the faculty of the Division
of the Physical Sciences and the special programs
approved by their departments. I have the honor to
present them as candidates for the degree of
Master of Science. ROBERT J. ZIMMER:
You have successfully completed a program of advanced
study in the physical sciences. And by virtue of the
authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the
degree of Master of Science. And I express the hope
that your learning will lead you to advance knowledge
in or enrich the practice of your chosen field. EDWARD W. KOLB: [READING NAMES] [APPLAUSE] Mr. President, each
of the students I now present has attained
scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has
prepared a dissertation that contributes to knowledge in a
particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of
the Division of the Physical Sciences, I now have the
honor to present them as candidates for the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy. ROBERT J. ZIMMER: By virtue of
the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy and welcome you to this
ancient and honorable company of scholars. EDWARD W. KOLB: [READING NAMES] [APPLAUSE] DANIEL DIERMEIER: The Dean
of the Division of the Social Sciences will now
present candidates for the degrees of Master of
arts and Doctor of Philosophy in programs in the Division
of the Social Sciences. DAVID NIRENBERG: Mr.
President, these students have completed the program
of studies prescribed by the faculty of the Division
of the Social Sciences and the special programs
approved by their departments. I now have the honor
to present them as candidates for the
degree of Master of Arts. ROBERT J. ZIMMER:
You have successfully completed a program of advanced
study in the social sciences. And by virtue of the
authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the
degree of Master of Arts. And I express the hope
that your learning will lead you to advance knowledge
in or enrich the practice of your chosen field. DAVID NIRENBERG: [READING NAMES] [APPLAUSE] Mr. President, each
of the students I now present has attained
scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has
prepared a dissertation that contributes to knowledge in a
particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of
the Division of the Social Sciences, I now have the
honor to present them as candidates for the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy. ROBERT J. ZIMMER: By virtue of
the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy and welcome you to this
ancient and honorable company of scholars. DAVID NIRENBERG: [READING NAMES] [APPLAUSE] DANIEL DIERMEIER: The Dean of
the University of Chicago Booth School of Business will
now present candidates for the degree of Master
of Business Administration in the Booth School. SUNIL KUMAR: Mr.
President, the students have completed the program of
professional studies prescribed by the faculty of the
University of Chicago Booth School of Business. I now have the honor
to present them as candidates for
the degree of Master of Business Administration. ROBERT J. ZIMMER: By virtue of
the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you
the degree of Master of Business Administration. And I express the hope that your
work will further wise choices in the allocation of
economic resources for the benefit of all people. PATTY KEEGAN: [READING NAMES] [APPLAUSE] DANIEL DIERMEIER: The Dean
of the Divinity School will now present candidates
for the degrees of Master of Divinity and
Doctor of Philosophy in programs in the
Divinity School. RICHARD A. HOSENGARTEN:
Mr. President, the student I now present
is academically qualified to engage in the
profession of ministry, having completed a course
of study prescribed by the faculty of
the Divinity School. I have the honor to present him
as a candidate for the degree of Master of Divinity. ROBERT J. ZIMMER: By virtue of
the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree
of Master of Divinity. And I express the
hope that your work will contribute to a learned
and effective ministry dedicated to the spiritual
welfare of humankind. RICHARD A. HOSENGARTEN:
Sunil Kumar Yadav. [APPLAUSE] Mr. President, the
student I now present has attained scholarly distinction
in advanced studies and has prepared a dissertation
which contributes to knowledge in a particular
field of research in the academic
study of religion. On behalf of the faculty
of the Divinity School, I have the honor to present him
as a candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. ROBERT J. ZIMMER: By virtue of
the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy and welcome you to this
ancient and honorable company of scholars. RICHARD A. HOSENGARTEN:
Sean Michael [? Hannan. ?] [APPLAUSE] DANIEL DIERMEIER: David
Awschalom, the Liew Family Professor in the Institute
for Molecular Engineering and the College,
will now present a candidate for the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy in programs in the Institute
for Molecular Engineering. DAVID D. AWSCHALOM:
Mr. President, the student I now present has
attained scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has
prepared a dissertation which contributes to knowledge in a
particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of
the Institute for Molecular Engineering, I have the
honor to present him as a candidate for the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy. ROBERT J. ZIMMER: By virtue of
the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy and welcome you to this
ancient and honorable company of scholars. DAVID D. AWSCHALOM: David
James [? Crystal. ?] [APPLAUSE] DANIEL DIERMEIER: Thomas
Ginsburg, Leo Spitz Professor in the Law School, will
now present candidates for the degree of
Doctor of Law, JD, in programs in the Law School. THOMAS GINSBURG: Mr.
President, this student has fulfilled all of the
requirements prescribed by the faculty of the
Law School to qualify her for the profession of law. I have the honor to present her
as a candidate for the degree of Doctor of Law. ROBERT J. ZIMMER: By virtue of
the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the
degree of Doctor of Law. And I express the
hope that your work will contribute to the
protection of liberty and the advancement of justice. THOMAS GINSBURG:
Shahrzad Daneshvar. [APPLAUSE] VICTORIA E. PRINCE: Please
rise for the singing of the University’s
“Alma Mater.” [MUSIC – THE UNIVERSITY
OF CHICAGO MOTET CHOIR, “ALMA MATER”] ROBERT J. ZIMMER: This is a
special day for all of you upon whom I’ve just
conferred a degree, and it is a special day for the
family members and friends who may be here to join you. It marks the completion
of your study, or at least one phase of that
study, a path that I trust has been challenging. I hope you are enjoying
this moment of celebration and perhaps moment of reflection
that this Convocation affords. You are now all graduates of
the University of Chicago. [APPLAUSE] Because of your achievements
that we celebrate here today with your family and
friends, each of you will always be connected to
the University of Chicago, a connection that I hope
that you and we will foster for many years. The University of
Chicago is an institution driven from its inception
by an idea, an idea that one could create
and continuously renew a university focused on
rigorous, intense inquiry and analysis. The university, through
its work every day, expresses the view
that clarity derives from the clash of ideas, the
challenge of assumptions, and the willingness to
accept answers only when they meet the tests of argument. We seek understanding that
is complex, expandable, and fluid rather than
simple and rigid, an understanding that reflects
analysis rather than ideology, that accepts complexity over
the comfort of simplicity, that seeks to delineate
both the power and limitations of
argument that is always ready to incorporate new
data, which can emerge and which must be sought. We believe that the best
education, the most empowering education, and the
most powerful learning take place in the environment
of constant challenge that is implicit in this
culture of rigorous inquiry and that this culture is
responsible for producing ideas of power and
importance to humankind. This focus on rigorous inquiry
has defined the University of Chicago, its research,
and its education at all levels since the
University’s beginning, and it continues to do so today. The University and its
culture are renewed every day by the work of its faculty,
students, and staff. And while it is natural to focus
on your own achievements today and what they mean
for your future, you can also take
great satisfaction in your contribution
to the ongoing renewal of your University, the
University of Chicago. I know that as graduates of this
University, in the coming years you will be called upon to
act, to speak, and to lead. And like so many University
of Chicago graduates who have come before you, you
will approach this challenge of leadership empowered by
your University of Chicago education. The power of analysis and ideas
that you have experienced here and that are now your
own will serve you wherever your path
takes you and whatever challenges you confront. Each of you who
received a degree today has received help and support
from parents, family, spouses, partners, children, friends,
mentors, or University faculty and staff. And while it is
your achievements that we all mark today,
all of these supporters can rightly take great pride
in your accomplishment. And so to all degree
recipients, please accept my congratulations
for all you have achieved. I wish you all good fortune and
happiness in the years ahead. Enjoy your coming adventures,
wherever they may lead you. Congratulations. [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC – THOMAS WEISFLOG,
“TRUMPET TUNE FOR ORGAN”] [APPLAUSE] VICTORIA E. PRINCE: This now
concludes the 528th Convocation of the University of Chicago. Crescat scientia;
vita excolatur. Let knowledge grow
from more to more; and so be human life enriched. [MUSIC – CHARLES MARIE
WIDOR, “SYMPHONY NO. 5”]

Michael Martin

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