2018 University of Washington Commencement Ceremony


[Music]>>ANNOUNCER: Ladies and Gentlemen! Welcome to the University of Washington’s
143rd Commencement ceremony, honoring the graduating class of 2018. [Music]>>ANNOUNCER: Please welcome the University
faculty, led by the Commencement Marshals, and the winners of the 2018 Awards of Excellence. [Music] ANNOUNCER: Now entering the stadium are candidates
for the various Doctoral and Professional degrees [Music] Carrying the gonfalons for the Graduate School
are Lisa Lalonde on the north and Tess Wilson on the south. Ms. Lalonde is receiving a Doctor of Philosophy
in French Studies. Tess is receiving a Doctor of Physical
Therapy degree. [Music] On the north, carrying the gonfalon for the
School of Pharmacy, is Skye Mitchell. Ms. Mitchell is receiving a Doctor of Pharmacy
degree. On the south, carrying the gonfalon for the
School of Law, is Leslie Wu. Ms. Wu is receiving a Juris Doctor degree. [Music] ANNOUNCER: Candidates for the various Master’s
degrees are now entering the stadium. Carrying the gonfalons for the Graduate School
are Terri Gu on the north and Shinichiro (Shane) Inamura on the south. Terri is receiving a Master of Public administration. Shane is receiving a Master of Science of Health administration. [Music] Also on the north, carrying the gonfalon for
the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance, is Chuan Fane. Ms. Fan is receiving a Master of Public Administration. Also on the south, carrying the gonfalon for
the School of Dentistry, is Alyssa Mueller. Ms. Mueller is graduating with a Doctor of
Dental Surgery. [Music]>>Ladies and Gentlemen, candidates for the
bachelor’s degrees from the College of Arts and Sciences are now entering the stadium. Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Design, Bachelor
of Fine Arts, and Bachelor of Music candidates are on the north. Bachelor of Science in Biology candidates
are also on the north. All other Bachelor of Science candidates enter
on the south. [Music] On the NORTH, carrying the gonfalon for the
College of Arts and Sciences, is Kristina Terwilliger, who is graduating with a Bachelor
of Music in Voice. Candidates receiving Bachelor of Science degrees are now entering on the south led by Gonfaloniere Brian Day. He is receiving Bachelor of Science in Neurobiology. [Music] Candidates from the College of Arts and Sciences
continue to enter on the north and south. Carrying the gonfalon on the north is Wendy
Henry, who is receiving a Bachelor of Arts in Integrated Social Sciences. [Music] Ladies and gentlemen, on the south side of
the stadium, please welcome bachelor’s candidates from the College of Education, led by gonfaloniere
Policarpio (Polo) Decano. Mr. Decano is receiving a Doctor of Philosophy
in Education: School Psychology. [Music] Ladies and gentlemen, entering on the south
side of the stadium, please welcome the bachelor’s candidates from the College of Education,
led by gonfalonieres Kaitlyn Zhou and Trevor Hedges. Ms. Zhou is receiving a Bachelor of Science
in Computer Science. Mr. Hedges is graduating with a Bachelor of
Science in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering. Candidate s from the College of Arts
and Sciences continue to enter from the north, led by gonfaloniere Sergio Garcia, who is
receiving a Bachelor of Arts in Law, Societies, and Justice. [Music] Now entering on the south are bachelor candidates
from the College of the Environment. Carrying the gonfalon is Jacob Hendrickson,
who is receiving a Bachelor of Science in Atmospheric Sciences: Meteorology. [Music] Bachelor candidates from the Information
School are now entering the stadium on the south. The Information School gonfalon is carried
by gonfalonieres Ethan Anderson and Joycie Yu. Each of them is receiving a Bachelor of Science
in Informatics. [Music] Candidates receiving Bachelor of Arts and
Bachelor of Science degrees from the College of Arts and Sciences are now entering from
the north, led by gonfaloniere Chenyibo Zhu, who is receiving a Bachelor of Arts in French
and Mathematics. [Music] Bachelor candidates from the Michael G.
Foster School of Business are now entering the stadium on the south, led by gonfalonieres
Macey McGovern and Alvin Benavides. Each is receiving a Bachelor of Arts in Business
Administration. [Music] The Bachelor candidates the School of Nursing
and the School of Medicine are now entering the stadium on the south. The School of Nursing is led by gonfalonier
Erica Soelling, who is receiving a Doctor of Nursing Practice in Family Nurse Practitioner. Carrying the gonfalon for the School of Medicine
is Vivian Hsiao, who is receiving a Doctor of Physical Therapy. [Music] Welcome now the bachelor candidates from the
College of Built Environments. They are led by gonfaloniere Sungjin Pang,
who is receiving a Bachelor of Science in Construction Management. [Music] On the NORTH, carrying the gonfalon for the
College of Arts and Sciences, is Ngaio Lace, who is receiving a Bachelor of Science in Psychology. [Music] The final groups of bachelor candidates entering
the stadium on the south are from the School of Public Health and the School of Social
Work. Carrying the gonfalon for the School of Public
Health is Xamantha Curameng, who is receiving a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Health. The School of Social Work candidates are led
by gonfaloniere Patricia Barnes, who is receiving a Master of Social Work in Administrative
and Policy Practice. [Music] Ladies and gentlemen, the members of
the Deans and President’s parties are about to enter the stadium. Will all graduates please take their seats. [Music] And now, please turn your attention to
the southwest corner of the stadium and welcome the procession of Deans of the University’s
sixteen schools and colleges. [Music] The academic procession concludes with the
entrance to the stadium of the University of Washington Regents, President, and Vice
Presidents, led by University Marshal Associate Professor Joseph Janes, of the Information
School. Will all graduates please remain standing
at your seats. [Music] Welcome to our beautiful campus. We’d like to begin this ceremony by acknowledging
the land on which the University rests, the land of the Coast Salish peoples, which touches
the shared waters of all tribes and bands within the Suquamish, Tulalip and Muckleshoot
nations. Today, we celebrate together. The commencement exercises of the University
of Washington will be opened with the presentation of the colors by the joint ROTC color guard
and the singing of the ‘Star Spangled Banner’ by Nicholas Varela. Mr. Varela is graduating today with a Bachelor
of Arts in Music: Music History, and a Bachelor of Music in Voice. The audience will please rise. [Music]>>Oh, say can you see by the dawn’s early
light What so proudly we hailed at the twilight’s last gleaming; Whose broad stripes and bright
stars, through the perilous fight, O’er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming? And the rocket’s red glare, the bombs bursting
in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there: Oh, say does that
star-spangled banner yet wave O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave? please be seated. It is now my pleasure to present to you the
President of the University of Washington, Ana Mari Cauce, who will preside over today’s
exercises. Welcome to the one hundred forty-third commencement
ceremony of the University of Washington. Commencement ceremonies are an expression
of academic traditions going back hundreds of years, and they symbolize some of the most
fundamental values of our civilization, most particularly, the pursuit of truth, the preservation
of freedom, and the cultivation of a climate of civility. This music is being provided by students of
the school of music wind ensemble under the direction of Professor Timothy Salzman. As you can tell, they are gifted musicians
and we greatly appreciate their participation today. Let’s thank them. These ceremonies are also festive, celebrating,
as the name suggests, not an end, but a commencement of new activities and challenges in the lives
of the graduates. Just a few years ago we welcomed you to the
University at Freshman Convocation in front of the same four columns that you see standing
behind me, all that remains of the original University that opened in 1861. At that convocation we told you we would see
you in front of these same columns when you graduated. Today that may seem like a lifetime ago, or
just yesterday, or maybe a little bit of both. But here you are! You made it! I am truly honored to be the first to formally
congratulate the degree and award recipients, and to welcome all of you to this ceremony. The ultimate responsibility for the University
lies with the members of the Board of Regents, ten citizens of the state who are appointed
by the governor and confirmed by the state senate. These dedicated men and women devote many
hours each year to the welfare of the University. Nine of our regents are with us this afternoon,
and I would like to introduce them at this time. Please hold your applause until all are introduced. Jeremy Jaech, the Chair of the Board Constance
W. Rice, Board Vice Chair William S. Ayer Joel Benoliel Kristianne Blake Jaron Reed
Goddard, the student member of the board Joanne Harrell Rogelio Riojas Blaine Tamaki Please
recognize our Board of Regents. In addition to the regents, we have seated
on the platform this afternoon the chief academic and administrative officers of the University,
the vice presidents, the deans of the schools and colleges, who will be introduced in due
course, faculty members, professors emeriti, the elected student leadership, whom you will
also meet a bit later, and other representatives from the various schools, colleges, and departments
of the University. We also have with us the chair of the faculty
senate, Thaisa Way, who represents one of the greatest faculties on the planet, of which
I am so proud to be a part. I am also very pleased to introduce Suzanne
Dale Estey, the president of our alumni association, which has been keeping the over 400,000 members
of the Husky alumni family connected with each other and with the University for more
than 125 years. I hope that you all join. I would also like to recognize the many members
of the faculty serving today as commencement marshals, and, in particular, our 2018 Awards
of Excellence recipients. Seven award winners are with us today: Alexes
Harris, Quintard Taylor, P. Dee Boersma, Gail Joseph, Frances McCue, Eldridge Alcantara,
and Chelsea Wood. The names of our marshals and award winners
are listed in your commencement program. Finally, of great importance today are family
members who have been so instrumental in helping each of our graduates achieve the tremendous
distinction they will be awarded today. I would like mothers, fathers (pause), family
members (pause) to stand and receive our thanks. Thank you for all of your support of our graduates. Now to the graduates. I’m so proud of every one of you. While you each took a different path to arrive
here today, not one of you got here without encountering setbacks, bumps in the road,
disappointments and frustrations. The fact that you’re sitting here today is
a And and testament to you, to your you resilience and determination, and to the people and organizations
who surround and support you. and You have equipped yourself with the knowledge,
schools, and credentials to open countless doors. If that door you want to open doesn’t exist
yet I know you’re going to invent it and build it for yourselves. You are a class that has not been waiting
for permission . You have already taken ownership of your power. And seized the opportunities before you. The degree you complete today isn’t a license
to create change, it is one more powerful arrow in your quiver to affect the change
that you are already making. Personally, I cannot wait to see what you
will do. I hope you will use your powerful minds, hats,
and voices to give back in ways that will help future generations and previous ones! I hope you will value compassion and empathy
and use the privilege that comes with this degree to lift up those who stumble, just
as you have been lifted up. I hope you will view yourselves as part of
a larger whole. And I encourage you to apply your tremendous
talent and energy to making that whole as inclusive and equitable as possible. We have miles to go, and big problems to solve,
but looking out at this sea of faces, I think of the incredible work you’ve done on
the stage, in the lab, marching in Red Square, or hunkered down in the library. And I am filled, not merely with hope, but
certainty, that our future is will in good hands, because it’s in YOUR hands. So, thank you for bringing your passion and
curiosity to the University of Washington. We are so proud to be part of your journey. You will always be welcome, so come visit
when your road leads you back here. Today, your journey does not commence, but
rather continues, onward and upward! Congratulations graduates! Now I would like to ask Susan Song and
Abe Bow to present the class gift. Susan is graduating today with a Bachelor
of Arts in political science. Abe is majoring in political science and psychology
and plans to graduate this summer. Susan was the chair of the Senior
Class Gift council and Abe was the vice chair. Thanks to their leadership the senior class
has made this wonderful early start in philanthropy. Here’s Abe.>>Thank you President Cauce. just a minor
correction, I will be receiving a psychology and political economics degrees. Good afternoon everyone. It’s an honor to speak in front of you today. I believe giving is more than just money. It is an act of care, support, and love. Being an immigrant who came here as a teenager, alone, with no family members here to support me, philanthropy has made it possible for
me to graduate from this prestigious University with honors. During my time at the University of Washington
I have received the Mary Gates scholarship and the Ralph Leonard Achievement award. These gifts have played a very important role in my success and I am thankful. But I also believe that there is a misconception that underrepresented
groups receive but don’t give. As a student leader I have taken the opportunity I’ve gottent here at the University of Washington to give back to my community. And of course, each one of us, especially those wearing a purple ribbon here today has our own story about why we want to give back. Because while we are grateful to receive,
we are just as eager to contribute. It is my great privilege to represent my fellow
graduates in passing the baton, in tradition of the University of Washington, to support future students. Congratulations class of 2018. Thank you. President Cauce, your commitment to equity,
diversity, tolerance and inclusion has helped transform my vision and understanding of my
future, and I’m deeply grateful. Like me, so many students have had the opportunity
to create a memorable Husky Experience. and And through this gift to the Boundless
Impact fund, we hope to create even more of those opportunities. Your leadership inspires us to entrust you
with this gift. We hope you will use it to continue the great
UW legacy of student-led initiatives that foster meaningful and transformative and experiences. And now, on behalf of the Class of 2018, we present
you with this scroll containing the names of all who gave to the class gift and we thank
everyone who has made this extraordinary moment possible for all of us. Thank you. That will be put to good use. Thank you. On behalf of a very grateful University and
future generations of students, I accept this generous gift from the class of 2018. Now all of you have a share in the future of the University. Since 1932 the University has presented medals
to the graduating seniors with the most distinguished academic records at the University. One medal is awarded to a student who has
completed at least three quarters of his or her degree requirements at the University
and rewarded to a student who entered the University with at least 60 transfer credits
from Washington community or technical college. The first recipient of this year’s president
metal is Grace Shannon Woodward. Grace, will you come forward. During her freshman — Grace? It’s not any fun if you don’t get to embarrass
them right next to you. During her freshman year Grace was chosen
for a research assistant position in the University Center for Anxiety and Stress. She engaged
in undergraduate research at the Center for 2 1/2 years and participated in three different
studies centered on the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder , ultimately, presenting her
research at the University of California Los Angeles. Grace was also an intern at Seattle Children’s
Hospital and the psychiatry and behavioral medicine unit. She traveled to Italy where
she studied the refugee crisis and assisted refugees and asylum seekers. Grace is graduating summa cum laude with
a bachelor of science in psychology. I am so pleased to be able to recognize you
with a medal. You earned it. The recipient for the President’s medal for
the student who enter the University from a Washington community college is Andrew Bogue. Andrew entered the University from Highline
College and decided to continue his studies as an education community and organizations
major in the College of Education. During his senior year he served as a reading, mathematics,
and enrichment intern at Northgate Elementary School where he provided academic support
and one-on-one tutoring services to students who are learning English and struggled with
literacy. Next year he will begin studies leading to
a Masters of Arts in teaching. Andrew is graduating summa cum laude
with a bachelor of arts and education, communities, and organization. Congratulations, Andrew. That is just the tip of the iceberg. All of our graduates have pretty amazing stories. For a moment I would like to recognize those
students who are graduating today with the University’s highest honors, summa cum laude, magna cum laude, and cum laude. Their names are listed on page
15 of the commencement program. A really important part of students experience
here, student government. It is an important component of governments
for the entire institution and its leadership is called on regularly to represent student
views on a wide range of issues. I am pleased to introduce you now to the president
of the associated students of the University of Washington , Osman Salahuddin, the president
of the professional student senate Soh Yeun Elloise Kim. Hello everyone. Congratulations to the graduating class of
2018. My name is Osman Salahuddin and I have the pleasure of serving
as your UW student body president. Before I begin I want to start by giving a
shout out to my parents who are here in attendance today. I also want to recognize all of the family, friends, and loved ones in the audience who are here supporting us. Let’s give them a huge round of applause. I could stand up here and tell you all about
how these past four years have been the best years of our lives, but I was only given two
minutes to talk. After chatting with my closed red Carter jungle
we decided to create something to share with you just how meaningful this moment is. Today is about two things. Thinking about what our future holds, but
just as important, remembering all of the amazing times that we have had at the University
of Washington. We came to the school as freshman, transfer
students , first-year graduate students , unsure of what this journey would hold for us . We
were ready to take on any challenge. Surrounded by some of the greatest oppressors
, intelligent peers, and one of the best campuses in the country our time at the University
was defined by every single decision that we made as students through all of the all
nighters, all of the difficulty getting into a major, all of the failure , college through
so many curveballs at us and sometimes we didn’t know what to do. We worked hard every single step of the way
and never gave up. After all of it we have had the opportunity
to learn, grow, have a fun, and most of all, find a lifelong community at one of the greatest
universities in the world. Here we are. Sitting at commencement today. These have been some of the greatest years
of our lives. These four years will not define us. We all have so much more to give. So as you
leave this amazing community always remember that you have the potential to make an amazing
impact on the world. Be curious. Ask questions. Never stop exploring new things. Transform the world around you and always
remember you don’t have to be perfect — we just have to be willing to try. Congratulations and Go Dawgs! Hello UW. Congratulations on completing grad school
and leaving for the next days of your life as masters and doctors. Bidding a farewell to the UW I hope your bag
of memories is full of good ones. Let’s not forget the fear that you would never
finish. After all of those you are here today holding
a completed degree. One message I would like to share as a fellow
grad student is to remember that you are capable of very many things. Often much more than what you believe you
can do. This year I had a blessing to serve as a graduate
student body president . However, my journey as an international student, a person of color and new native English
speaker pursuing a PhD in English has not always been easy . Yet, with the generous
help of many mentors, advisors, colleagues, and friends I can be where I am today. Grad school is not just where we earn more
knowledge. We grow as people. With years of study, research, teaching , community
services we are leaders already . By leaders I do not mean somebody leading as chief person
or who gets promoted higher or faster than other people. I believe there are many ways to be a leader. UW has helped and challenged those to become
better people . Not just with our head , but with our heart. I ask you to occupy a space
in the community you will join after UW with integrity and compassion. And become a serving
leader who makes a positive impact and who is giving. I would like to conclude with Audrey Lord’s
message that says, when I dare to be powerful to use my strength in the service of my vision
then it becomes less and less important whether I’m afraid. With this humble message I salute you congratulations. Go Huskies. –Aren’t our students wonderful? Today we have plenty graduates, a graduate
of our own school of medicine and someone who has dedicated his life to improving the
health and circumstances of low-income children and families throughout Washington State. He is currently the Senior Medical Director
and Janet and Jim Sinegal Endowed Chair for the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic. He is also a pediatrician at Seattle Children’s
Hospital, a clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington, and a one
founding co-director of the Washington Medical-Legal Partnership. Please join me in giving a very warm welcome
to Dr. Benjamin Danielson! Wow! Thank you so much! I am so nervous I’m taking a second to sign
in. This is really wonderful. I’m especially happy that you guys are so
popular that even the clouds wanted to come and see what was going on here today. You guys are pretty amazing. I can’t tell you what an incredible honor
it is to be here today. My name is Ben Danielson and I’m really pleased
to be part of this celebration. I may UW med school alum and a pediatrician
at a community clinic here in Seattle. I thought I would talk today about mentorship
of learning, teaching, growing, through the lens of mentorship. I thought I would start with my mom, Jude. At first I didn’t tell my mom that I was going
to be providing this talk today. Partly because she doesn’t like a big to do. A big deal. And today is really a big deal. It is all for you. My mom, she rescued me from foster care. She struggled in the midst of abject poverty
to raise me and my sisters. This moment would be penultimate for her. It would. She is so strongly instilled in us the value
of a good education. As a way to be better individuals, to be
a better service, and to lift us out of economic deprivation. Your graduating from this incredible university
would be penultimate for her. I’m sure that my mom right after scolding
me for not calling her more often would want to share some of her wisdom with you. Mom is a bit of a counter cultural hippie. She does things her own way. Anyway, she
has perfected a special kind of compliment sandwich that I want to share with you today. It reminds me a little bit of those fancy
French grilled sandwiches, those croque madames, I called this from Jude, my mom, I call it the croque mama. Savory
compliments all over it make you feel good. And then there is this hard question, sort
of a heart wrenching moralism, a thought jarring crust of a challenge. A sudden contrast of the flavor and heat and
righteous CRISP. My mom my say something to you all like welcome
to your future. You have accomplished something really amazing and I’m quite proud of you. Before you get all too full of yourself and
your fancy robes and funny hats you know, don’t you, that you didn’t do this alone? This stadium is full, full of people who
helped you get there in ways big and small. For every one in this stadium there are 10
more people that you know in your lives that have helped you. For every one of them there are 10 more people
that you will never meet who made it possible for you to get to this moment. They held
doors open minds changed, lessons learned, simple kindnesses, working overtime , creating
space, nudging, tugging, lifting, lifting you up. Do you know what? My mom is right. And that the classic croque mama. Or maybe she would say welcome to your future. You are a remarkable group of people who have
worked incredibly hard and deserve a chance to pause and celebrate. I have a list of requests that I need to jump
on right away because the world is really hurting, your predecessors have done some
major damage and I need to get to working on fixing it. She would be right. And you have just been croke mama-ed. Jude, my hippie mom, would keep at you. She would say welcome to your future. You’ve worked so hard, grown so much, prepared so well to go forth and achieve great things,
reach great heights. But you do remember, don’t you, that who you are as a person will always
matter more than what title should carry? She would say, I want you to do well in the
world, but I need you to do good in the world. She would be right. Wouldn’t she? Croque mama. Jude, my counter cultural hippie mom would
also want you to know how proud she is of every one of you. She would be perfectly happy for those of
you who know exactly what you’re doing next and where you want your path to lead. But she would feel a special kinship and warmth
for those of you who are entering your futures with some sense of uncertainty. She would celebrate your uncertainty and encourage
you to do the same. She would say embrace uncertainty. Uncertainty
is actually where the most personal growth occurs. Uncertainty is the space where creativity
thrives. She would say that uncertainty is a prerequisite
for radical transformational change and she really wants transformational change to happen
in this world. And so do I. My mom, Jude, would talk about how much better
life is when you can’t actually see that far down your path. Jude might say that she finds those people
who only experience privilege, only travel the straight and straightforward path just
aren’t quite as interesting to her. For my part I also appreciate those who have
known hardship. I find I learn the most from them. I tended to find them the most interesting. I find them the most remarkable. Just like my most remarkable mom, who’s very
uncertain path goes all the way back at least this far as the moment she chose to rescue
me from foster care. My hope for all of you, graduates, friends,
family is that your lives are full. Full of remarkable people and that you have the
vision to notice just how remarkable they are. Most of the most remarkable people I know
are women. There is a certain , yeah —
you know, of course, I start with my wife. And there is a certain university president
near me, Ana Mari Cauce, who is incredibly remarkable. My mom would like you very much. There is another, Anna Claes, who started
Seattle Children’s Hospital over 100 years with a promise to treat every child regardless of the child’s race, religion, ability to pay. Our clinic, the Odessa Brown children’s clinic,
is named after a remarkable woman. A single black mom whose tireless community
activist. I think my mom would have really liked Odessa. Our clinic’s first medical director, a remarkable
woman. Doctor Blanche would be so, a strong leader who assured our patients are treated
with dignity and who expected more out of the people around her. Not a hippie, but
my mom still would have liked her. I learned that my work would really be like
in the clinic from Liz Thomas, the first African-American to graduate from this university’s advanced
practice nursing program. Yeah. You see, when I first started working in the
clinic I think I had this idea that the good I could do would be based solely on my training. Based on my degrees and on the direct treatment
of young patients. Then Ms. Thomas, she grabbed me and walked me outside. She pointed away from the clinic and into
the surrounding community and she said, there, out there is where your best work will be done. You have to care about the kids who never
come through our clinic doors just as much as you care about the ones who do. Do you know what? She was right. Her lessons remind me that your university
experience is much more than some accumulation of class hours. You are much more than the confining definition
of your degrees. A degree, a set of skills, they are access
codes. They unlock the opportunity to do some good
and you will likely find, like I did, that the greatest good you do may have the least
to do with your actual degree. I hope you remember this. To me you inspire
a hopeful promise for our future and the promise you offered to the spaces beyond this campus
is thanks to the great preparation you received within this university. It has sparked a flame in you. It has encouraged you to direct it will outwardly
into the world and encouraged its light to shine inwardly within this campus. For this university, this institution has
a remarkable capacity to build foundations of critical thinking and ideation and fairness
and a robust discourse. It is also true that no institution, no entity,
no campus in this country is free of bias towards appearance or ableness, age or maleness, heteroness or
whiteness, or wealthyness. You know this. Some of you know this all too well. These struggles exist within and without these
walls. I want you to hear me. Hear me when I say
you are ready. Ready to be the authors that rewrite a more
equitable world. You are ready. You carry the fundamental gifts, the essential
tools. You practice pono. Another remarkable person,
another mentor, she talked about the native Hawaiian concept of pono. A word that encompasses equity, morality,
correctness, healing, and goodness. That’s a lot of character in one word, but
it is the right word for you. I see you moving forward in the world with
pono. I say this with confidence because I have
gotten to know some of you. I have to tell you that you are a different
generation. I don’t mean that in a croque mama kind of way. You are an inspiring transformational
generation. You or someone like you, you have helped me
along the way many times. SUS leaders of impending change. People like me, so-called community leaders,
we are so humbled and inspired by you. You have been my mentor’s. I count you among the students of many paths
why consider especially in these recent years to be the most cherished teachers. You have shown a presence, a perspective that
people like me need to heed . You have presumed the big transforming change is possible. Not just possible, probable thanks to you. You questioned and challenged and pushed you
are my mentors. This is true today with you especially, but
also it is and ageless truth here. One of the most important lessons I learned
here at the University was that no matter where you are in your education, your profession,
in life you are always a student and always a teacher. I look to you in your role as teachers and
I know you will enter the next phases of your lives as catalysts, as elders and welders
helping this world let go of inner based isolationism come its tendency towards other
and segregation. Like a warm hug you will remind us how much
more we have in common than we have that divides us . How much more our interests are shared
interests. Our needs are common needs. Our strengths are collaborative strengths. You will be are champions of belonging. I don’t mean a belonging that morphs us all
into some kind of indistinguishable in the I don’t refer to a belonging that is a lessening
of our you does of our uniqueness. I have been in too many places of power that
speak to wanting diversity, wanting inclusiveness, but actually mean that they want you to act
more like them. I have seen people believe that their way,
because of their power and their view their way is the only way and the right way. I wonder if that is stifling us as a society? A leader in Native American healthcare once
said, if every time you go to a meeting everyone looks like you , everyone thinks like you,
everyone talks like you, everyone agrees with you, then you are going to the wrong meetings. Our differences actually make us more connected
. They make us better. There is a more beautiful , messier, creative,
expressive, enriching kind of longing that can transform us . You will help to set that
kind of a table. I look forward to working beside you , inspired
by your courageous humanity . Important choices will visit you. When they do your decency, your sense of Pono
will be your guide. You will choose well and you will choose boldly,
undaunted by those old phrases like this is always the way we have done things worth these
challenges are just too big to fix. You will make big decisions courageously and
see the bigger issues and even the smallest of decisions. If you’re presented with a choice to have
a few material gains or to stave off environmental catastrophe you will choose the earth. I see you practice the Jewish tradition of
tikkun olam – the practice of repairing the world in a commitment to civic action. Another phrase full of meaning and exemplary
of who you are. I admire that you are not afraid to try. You are not afraid to try and experience failure. This is a strength. One of you, who is one
of my mentors and a talented local artist, use the line a setback is only a set up for
a comeback. I admire that fail forward attitude. I admire this university for nurturing it. It engenders a certain kind of courage, doesn’t it? You might not even notice that you have that
kind of courage until you really need it, but it is there. It will guide you as we transform society
together. I think big changes are coming because fear
won’t hold you back. I think of the east German philosopher Rudolf
Barrow who said when the forms of the old culture are dying the new culture is created
by a few people who are not afraid. That is you. You –yes — you are
directed by a compelling inner compass through it you have guided me not to fear the hard
fight nor the complex, nor even the impractical. People like me are not just sitting on the
sidelines waiting for you. We are on this journey with you. Changing the world is hard work. We see you take the harder path of justice
and dignity and equity. Even if that hard path is impractical, because an impractical morality
beats and immoral practicality any day of the week. The weight is shared across our shoulders. Together we want fear a hard fight or shy
from hard truths. We can advance balanced discussions about
our society that this country offers much good and there are also realities . The reality
that privilege is real. And so is racism and oppression. That some people are lifted up on warm thermals
towards institutions like this from day one while others face cold vortices that pull
them toward disconnection and even prison. These are important truths. We can show that the truth still matters. We together can repair what a very snarky
dentist friend of mind tends to call an epidemic of truth decay. We can on our several truths, understand one
truth without rejecting another. We can care about the struggles of a family
in the most rural setting, acknowledge their denigration’s and the invisibility they feel
just as we can care about the struggles of the family in an urban setting . Acknowledging
those denigration’s and invisible feelings. We can care about women’s rights, LGBTQI rights,
immigration rights, ages and related rights, ableness rights. When we stand up for those we are not treading
on anyone else’s rights. You will help all of us choose a better world. A world where quality education and quality healthcare are universal rights for everyone. A world where nutritious food and a roof over one’s head happened for everyone before any grand luxury happens for anyone. A world where every child’s promising potential
is treated like the incredible treasure that it is. A world where classrooms, street corners,
and police interactions are never places where we have to worry about the safety of our children
or youth. You will help us choose a world where every dreamer, every dreamer has a chance to sit where you do today no matter where they or their parents started. You can tell you inspire me. Don’t you? You will remain bold and audacious. When called for you will exercise dangerous
thinking and irrational behavior. You will nurture the value of disrespect for
authority. You will stand tall and raise your fist you
will take a knee. You will stand. You will sit. You will take a knee if conscience says it’s
the right thing to do. And you will make sure that anyone else can
do any of those things as well. You know that those are actually the actions
that fulfill the promise. The promise that this is the remarkable country
that it says it is. Make your own way. Name your own path. Your own career. Be a chief joy executive. Be a master of hope administration. Be a certified disruptor. The an iconaclast technician. Be an unstoppable force of good for the lives
you touch. For the systems that need breaking. Be a rebel with a cause. It is okay. It is really okay to not decide what you want
to do. There is still so much more time for that. Besides, my mom, Jude would love you for it. Put your energy instead to deciding who you
are. How you show up in your life. How you show yourself to the world. The world is on the brink of change. You can feel it. You can almost see it. What a great time to graduate. There is this readiness, this feeling of impending
hope. I can feel it. It is near it is close. It is so very close. You are its authors . Change is on the way. It is this impending hope. It is only waiting for you to step in your
grace and power. The writer Arundhati Roy wrote another
world is not only possible , she is on her way. On a quiet day I can hear her breathing. On a quiet day I can hear her breathing. Thank you very much.>>Ladies and gentlemen, we are now ready
to present the various degrees to all candidates. Degrees will be conferred by the Board of
Regents, Jeremy Jaech. The audience is requested to remain in their
seats until the conclusion of today’s ceremony. Candidates for doctoral
degrees will be presented by the several deans. For the School of Medicine, Associate Dean
Sara Kim. It is an honor to recommend the 223 candidates
for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Many of these graduates have proceeded to
graduate training positions throughout the country. Those participating in today’s ceremony will
come forward with the other doctoral candidates. Associate Dean Sara Gordon, School of Dentistry. It is my pleasure to present the candidates for Doctor of Dental Surgery. These candidates were honored previously in
separate ceremonies. The present candidates will please come forward
with the other doctoral candidates. Interim Dean Anita Krug, School of Law. On behalf of the faculty of law, I have the honor of presenting the 176 candidates
for the degree of Juris Doctor. The law graduates participating in this ceremony
will please come forward with the other doctoral candidates. Dean Sean Sullivan, School
of Pharmacy. On behalf of the faculty of the School of Pharmacy, It is my honor to present the 89 candidates for the degree of Doctor of Pharmacy. These candidates will please come forward
with the other doctoral candidates. Interim Dean Rebecca Aanerud of the Graduate
School. Here with us today are candidates who have
completed all requirements for the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy, Education, Musical
Arts, Physical Therapy, Audiology and Nursing Practice. On behalf of the deans of the schools and
colleges and the graduate faculty, I am pleased and honored to recommend these candidates for the highest degree awarded by the University of Washington. It is my distinct pleasure to present you, Regent Jaech, all of the doctoral
degree candidates from the various schools and colleges. On behalf of the Board of Regents and the
faculties of the respective schools, I am pleased to confer upon these candidates their
respective doctoral degrees. Congratulations. You have achieved high academic distinction,
and this University salutes you. You will be presented today with a memento
of this graduation exercise. Please come forward. Will all doctoral degree candidates from schools and colleges please rise. [ Graduate names being read. ] Candidates for Masters degrees will be presented by Associate Dean Craig Thomas of the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance and Interim Dean Annerud of the Graduate School. Candidates for Masters degrees in the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance will please rise. I am honored to present these candidates to receive their respective masters degrees. Candidates please remain standing. Candidates for the various masters degrees for all schools and colleges will please rise. On behalf of the dean of the schools and colleges and the graduate faculty, I am honored to present these candidates to receive their respective masters degrees. It is my distinct honor to present to you Regent Jaech, all of the masters degree candidates from the various schools and colleges. On behalf of the Board of Regents and the graduate faculty I am please to confer upon each of you your masters degrees. Congratulations. You will be presented today with a momento of this graduation exercise. Please come forward. [ MUSIC. Graduates receiving master’s degrees. ] Candidates for bachelor’s degrees in the various colleges and schools of the University will presented by several deans. The candidates who have been accepted by the general faculty of the University for their respective degrees are listed in the commencement program. For the College of Arts and Sciences Dean Robert Stacey. Candidates from the College of Arts and Sciences will please rise. Is it my honor to present these candidates for the degrees of bachelor of arts, bachelor of fine arts, bachelor of design, bachelor of music, and bachelor of science and to recommend that they be awarded degrees. Candidates will please be seated. Associate Dean Carol Davis, College of Education. The candidates from the College of Education please rise. I am proud to present these candidates for bachelor’s of arts degrees in early childhood family studies and education, communities, and organizations. And to recommend that they be awarded their degrees. Candidates please be seated. Dean Michael Bragg, College of Engineering Candidates from the College of Engineering please rise. I am pleased to present these candidates of the College of Engineering for the degrees of bachelor’s of science, bachelor’s of science in engineering, bachelor’s of science in aeronautical and astronautical engineering, bioengineering, chemical engineering, civil and environmental engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, human centered design and engineering, industrial and systems engineering, materials science and engineering, and mechanical engineering and to recommend that they be awarded their respective degrees. Candidates please be seated. Dean Lisa Graumlich, College of the Environment The candidates from the nation’s largest College of the Environment will please rise. It is my pleasure and honor to present these candidates of the College of the Environment for the degrees of bachelor of arts, bachelor of science, bachelor of science in forest resources, and bachelor of science in aquatic and fisheries sciences and to recommend that they be awarded their respective degrees. Candidates will please be seated. Dean Anind Dey of the Information School. Candidates from the world’s leading Information School please rise. It gives me great pleasure to present the candidates of the Information School and the future information leaders of the world for the degree of bachelor of science informatics, and to recommend that they be awarded their bachelor’s degrees. Candidates will please be seated. Dean James Jiambalvo, Michael G. Foster School of Business. The candidates from the Michael G. Foster School of Business will please rise. It is with much pleasure that I present these candidates for bachelor’s degrees in the Foster School of Business and recommend that they be awarded their respective bachelor’s degrees. Candidates will please be seated. Dean Azita Emami, School of Nursing. Degree candidates from the number one public School of Nursing in the nation please rise. It’s my pleasure and honor to present these candidates for the degree of bachelor of science in nursing, and that they be awarded their bachelor’s degree. Candidates will please be seated. Associate Dean Sara Kim, School of Medicine. Will the bachelor’s candidates from the School of Medicine please rise. It is a privilege to present these bachelor candidates from the School of Medicine in the specialized fields of medical technology, prosthetics and orthotics, and physician assistant, and to recommend they be awarded their respective bachelor’s degrees. Candidates will please be seated. Dean John Schaufelberger, College of Built Environments. Will the candidates from the School of Built Environments please rise. I have the honor to present these candidates for bachelor’s degrees in architecture, landscape architecture, construction management, and community and environmental planning and to recommend that they be awarded their respective bachelor’s degrees. Candidates please be seated. Associate Dean Tessa Evans-Campbell, School of Social Work. Candidates for the School of Social Work please rise. On behalf of the Social Work faculty, it is my great privilege to present these candidates for their bachelor’s degrees in social welfare and to recommend that they be awarded their respective bachelor’s degrees. Candidates please be seated. Interim Dean Joel Kaufman, School of Public Health. Will the candidates for the School of Public Health please rise. It is with much pleasure that I present these candidates for bachelor’s degrees in the top public School of Public Health in the world and recommend that they be awarded their respective degrees. All bachelor candidates from all schools and colleges just presented will please rise. Following recent Regent Jaech’s citation awarding the various bachelor’s degrees all candidates will be seated immediately and under direction of the faculty marshals will await their turn to come forward one row at a time. It is my distinct honor and privilege to present to you Regent Jaech all of the bachelor’s degree candidates from the various schools and colleges. On behalf of the Board of Regents and the faculty of the University, I am pleased to confer on each of you your bachelor’s degree. Congratulations. You will be presented today with a memento of this graduation exercise. Please come forward as directed by the marshals. [Music. Graduates presented bachelor’s degrees] The University of Washington Men’s Glee Club, under the direction of Alonso Vezuela, will now lead us in the singing of Rise Up with Pride for Washington. The words to the song are printed on the inside of the back cover of the commencement program. The audience will please rise. [ SINGING ] The audience and members of the graduating
class are requested to remain at their seats until the recessional of the faculty is concluded. Once the stage party has left the stadium
graduates may exit the field via the stairs at the west end of the stadium or to the East as you entered. Please remain at your seat until the recessional is over. The 143rd commencement exercises of the University of Washington are now closed.

Michael Martin

5 Responses

  1. This is bad! Poorly designed! Starting at 1:44:28 the screen is about 70% purple background and the UW logo; only about 30% of the screen is for 4 tiny images of grads walking across the stage. At 1:59:22 again it's about 30% of the screen for 4 tiny images of undergrads; do you think seeing the purple background is more important? You did not need to keep the BACHELOR'S DEGREES graphics on the screen so long; I think we got the idea. Next time, get rid of the Tagboard, or shrink it and put it down at the bottom as low as possible (where BACHELOR'S DEGREES is here), and please EXPAND the 4 small images to fill as much of the screen as possible! People want to see their loved ones — those crossing the stage.

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